How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushrooms as a Seafood Substitute

How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushrooms as a Seafood Substitute

How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushrooms as a Seafood Substitute


Whether you’re avoiding seafood for dietary, moral, or environmental reasons, it’s impossible to not crave delicious dishes, like crab cakes, lobster rolls, or fish fillets, every now and then. 

Which is why it’s so wonderful that tasty meat substitutes like Lion’s Mane mushrooms exist! These fluffy mushrooms are full of flavor and have a great hearty texture. 


To help you learn how to cook Lion’s Mane mushrooms as a seafood substitute, this guide features tasty Lion’s Mane mushroom recipes. You’ll love these dishes so “mush”, they’ll become some of the “mane” recipes your prepare! 


How To Cook Lion’s Mane Mushrooms as Seafood 

Although Lion’s Mane is considered a “gourmet” mushroom by many high-end restaurants, it’s actually fairly easy to prepare. 

In particular, Lion’s Mane mushrooms are a great substitute for seafood. Their light yet meaty texture and vaguely fishy flavor are flawlessly translated into seafood recipes. 

To prepare Lion’s Mane you can slice it up, cut it up into lumps, or shape it into fillets. Below are recipes where lion’s mane mushrooms were substituted for crab, lobster, and fish. 

How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushroom as a Crab Substitute 

“Don’t Be a Crab” Cakes 

Let them eat crab cakes! These delicious crab cakes have a slightly tangy, completely decadent flavor that will have you coming back for bite after bite. They are fairly easy to prepare and packed with energizing veggies which pair well with the uplifting effects lion’s mane mushrooms can support.* 

Sauteed Lion’s Mane Mushrooms With Garlic 

This super simple recipe takes advantage of lion’s mane mushrooms innately crab-like flavor. While it may only require 3 ingredients: Lion’s Mane mushrooms, butter, and garlic, it’s fairly flavorful. Whip this up on nights when you just need something that’s not only simple but also simply delicious. 

How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushroom as a Lobster Substitute 

Lion's Mane "Lobster" Roll

Who needs Maine lobster rolls when you can have lion’s mane lobster rolls? 

Featuring classic lobster roll ingredients like mayo, Old Bay seasoning, and lemon juice, this dish stays true to everything you love about traditional lobster rolls- barring the actual lobster of course. What can we say, this recipe is on a roll! 

Lion’s Mane Lobster Bites 

Cooking lobster was never this easy! 

If you’re looking for a filling snack or an easy-to-make light entree, you can whip this dish up in a half-hour. All you need is lion’s mane, olive oil, butter, and salt. Sautee the lion’s mane clumps until they are decadently crispy and then enjoy! 

How to Cook Lion’s Mane Mushroom as a Fish Substitute 

Lion's Mane Fillets

This filling fillet is a great way to prepare savory lion’s mane mushrooms. The only ingredients it requires are Lion’s Mane mushrooms, ghee, white wine, shallots, and a pinch of salt. Fry the lion’s mane mushrooms like fillets and enjoy them on bread or by themselves! 

Vegetarian Gumbo 

One of the best seafood dishes of all time is obviously gumbo, and THIS may be one of the best gumbo’s you’ve ever had. Pulling inspiration from classic Louisiana ingredients, this light and flavorful gumbo is soup-er delicious! While it may take some time and a long list of ingredients to make, it’s well worth it.



Lion’s Mane mushrooms make such a great seafood substitute because just like meat, they help support your energy and mood.* 

If you want to experience Lions Manes’ uplifting effects on a daily basis check out Mushroom Revival’s Lion’s Mane Focus Tincture.* Supporting mental clarity, gut functioning, and the nervous system, this wonderful tincture concentrates all of the incredible benefits of Lion’s Mane mushrooms.*

Read more about Lion’s Mane mushrooms, and why you should incorporate them into your diet, on Mushroom Revival’s blog, or hear about it on our podcast

Written by: Helen Lewis

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.